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F.A. Davis Favorite Health Care Podcasts

Our Favorite Health Care Podcasts

Podcasts are becoming one of the quickest-growing methods for people to receive news and entertainment. According to Pew Research, podcast listenership reached its highest point in 2014, with the success of such podcasts like Serial and the launch of three new podcast networks.

In 2015, the trend is continuing, and we are now at a point where nearly double the amount of people are listening to podcasts than in 2008 (from 9% of Americans to 17%).

There is no shortage of podcasts for all these new listeners. There are comedy podcasts, ones about celebrity gossip, podcasts that talk about your favorite book, movie, show, etc. Basically, there is a podcast for everything. And some of the best podcasts are the ones that are healthcare-related.

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F.A. Davis Undergraduate Nursing Scholarship

Brand New F.A. Davis Undergraduate Nursing Scholarship!

Here at F.A. Davis, we know that nurses are caring and compassionate by nature, and that the field they’ve chosen to embark on is rewarding. But sometimes, nursing can be very challenging, and those challenges begin on Day One of nursing school. We want to do what we can to help. That’s why our nursing team created our first annual Undergraduate Nursing Scholarship. We’ll be giving $1,500 to a lucky LPN/LVN, RN, or RN-BSN student in the U.S. or Canada. Read on for more details!

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Jamaican Tings Physical therapy blog by Larry Devinney

Where Will Your Career in Health Care Take You?

As you are preparing for graduation and starting your career, you will see that there are many different directions that you can go. If you are looking for an adventure and want to see what it could be like working as a physical therapist outside of the United States, check out this blog written by Larry Devinney, a recent PT graduate of Arcadia University. He has been living in Junction, Saint Elizabeth, Jamaica since August 2014 working as a PT for Friends of the Redeemer United (FOR U). FOR U has a mission to encourage the healing process through awareness and involvement in spiritual, social, educational, and health-related services in rural Jamaica.

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Physical Therapy Clinical Tips

Guest Blog: The Top 5 Things I Have Learned in Clinical Practice

 

Note: guest blogger Joseph Brence, PT, DPT, FAAOMPT, COMT, DAC is a Physical Therapist and clinical researcher from Pittsburgh, PA. This article originally published on his blog, Forward Thinking PT

When confronted by a student or new grad, I am consistently asked what tips I have for clinical practice.  During my time in clinical practice, I have gained a good amount of experience from taking risks, making mistakes and challenging my own modes of thinking.  Here are the top 5 things I have learned in 5.5 years of practice.

5.  Say Yes to Opportunity.  

I have always been a hard worker.  I have worked as a farm hand, factory worker, job coach, etc. and I have learned a considerable amount from those experiences.  Clinically, I have worked in multiple treatment environments, on large randomized-control trials, and in multiple areas of publication.   By saying yes to presented opportunities, I have afforded myself the opportunity to be mentored by world-class clinicians, researchers and writers.  I have never left an opportunity without another opportunity presenting itself.  And I often say yes to that next opportunity.

Saying “Yes”, early in your career, will lead to some great experiences.  Sure, every clinician is busy attempting to achieve unrealistic productivity standards but by challenging yourself to take on that extra project, you will learn how diverse your degree can become.

4. Clinical expertise is not simply gained through practice and it is most definitely not the same concept as clinical experience.

In March 2014, I wrote about the concept of clinical expertise.  This post was born out of observing an online discussion in which several practitioners were attempting to reason that their point was more valid, because they held more years of clinical experience.   They were reporting this concept was one of the three arms of evidence-based medicine, but in actuality, they were demonstrating  a common misconception of Sackett’s model.   While the “years of experience” argument leads to a genetic fallacy,  it highlights how individual interpretation can lead to an err in reasoning.   We need to discuss and argue concepts, stay on task while discussing those topics and not fall into the trenches of arguing virtues and misnomers.

We must remember that clinical expertise is built through assessment of your ability to think, reason and apply scientifically plausible principles into practice.   It requires peer-review.  It requires your thoughts and ideas to be challenged.  It requires a hint of uncertainty.

3. We have a lot of special tests; but many really aren’t that special. 

I remember sitting in my row house on the Southside of Pittsburgh on a Friday night (this is a happening spot btw…not many people stay in on a Friday night), sipping on a PBR, and staring at the pictures in Dutton’s text.

I have always been a very visual learner and am fortunate to be able to read or see something, and retain it.   I spent countless nights repetitively doing this same routine until my knowledge bank could recite and demonstrate a load of “special” tests.  While this lead to me successfully passing practicals and tests, I rarely utilize many of the tests that I once memorized…simply because most don’t tell me very much.

My clinical practice revolves around a lot of assessment and reassessment, as well as trial and error.  The human condition is individual and once I have medically screened my patients (this is when I utilize some highly sensitive tests) and ruled out any serious medical pathology, my focus is on the chief complaint and comparable sign.  We must remember, we don’t treat pathology (this is a hit to the ego of many new grads; but its not our role); we treat movement disorders that are often stiff and/or painful.

2. Utilize Occam’s Razor.  

Occam’s Razor: It states that among competing hypotheses, the one with the fewest assumptions should be selected. Other, more complicated solutions may ultimately prove correct, but—in the absence of certainty—the fewer assumptions that are made, the better.

1. Writing is a great means to learn about yourself and learn about others. It also allows you to reflect and observe your evolution as a thinker and clinician.

I began blogging soon after graduation for The PT Project (which is now defunct).   I did this as a creative means for documenting observations I thought was seeing.  I enjoyed getting feedback from PTs all over the world and learning about things I had not yet learned.  In this process I had to push aside the strong ego that coincided with my own beliefs (I was a “Doctor” of Physical Therapy for goodness sakes.  I knew all…).  I will admit this was quite a challenge, but when individuals had more logical arguments for an observation, than myself, I had 2 potential roads to take: 1. Stand by my beliefs    2. Nod farewell, release a belief, and adopt the more logical argument (often making less assumption—see Occam’s Razor above).

If I were to add a sixth thing to my list, it would be “you never stop learning“.   Let me share some of the  courses in which I (have) learn(ed):

1. MedBridge — We push this a lot on this site, but it really is the best online platform for very affordable CEUs.  It is very well-worth the money.

2. Maitland Australian Physiotherapy Seminars.  Chris Showalter and his team at MAPs truly offer a fantastic course series, that can result in a COMT.  I was fortunate enough to complete this series last year and it really helped me refine my clinical reasoning processes.

3. Nxt Gen Institute.  I am quite biased here, but I would love for you to explore the opportunities offered at Nxt Gen.

4. Sports Medicine of Atlanta.  While SMA is closely affiliated with Nxt Gen, Dr. DuVall continues to offer great education programs in the realm of medical screening and differential diagnosis.   SMA also has a Fellowship in Manual Therapy that focuses on creation of the modern manual therapist and autonomous practitioner.

What advice would you give?  

National Nurses Week 2015 at F.A. Davis Company

Health Care Link Roundup: Nurses Week Edition!

First things first…

Happy National Nurses Week 2015

HAPPY NURSES WEEK! At F.A. Davis, we are constantly humbled by the compassion, expertise, and skill that comes from our nursing authors and contacts, and we hope all our nursing friends are taking the time this week to celebrate your profession. Read on for some links we thought you would enjoy this week!

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